DISCLAIMER:
The publication of any images or informations related to nazism, fascism or any other totalitarian regimes must be understood as the reproduction of historical accuracy and not as apology to these regimes, leaders or symbols.
ATENÇÃO:
A publicação de qualquer imagem ou informação referentes ao nazismo, fascismo ou quaisquer outros regimes totalitários deve ser entendida como reprodução do rigor histórico e não como apologia a estes regimes, líderes ou símbolos.

Leyland Retriever - GS version - 6x4 British lorry - 3 ton - case report

Drivers!!

    Again, we are going to visit this robust and versatile girl, almost a symbol of English 6x4 trucks. We are talking about the early Leyland Retriever 6x4 3 ton british truck, in General Service standards...


Leyland Retriever (early) 6x4 3 ton. lorry - GS body

History:

    The Leyland Retriever was a 6x4 truck produced by Leyland Motors for the British Army between 1939 and 1945. The retriever was based on the Leyland Terrier.
Leyland Terrier in tests with Canadian Army - 1930's.
    The first models had an open cabin with canvas top. Later versions were a windscreen in metal frame. The Retriever was a three-axle vehicle with two rear drive axles (6 × 4).
Leyland Retriver (early and late)
    On behalf of the British War Office developed rear axle was prescribed by the UK MoD for the Retriever and all other trucks built for the British Army with three tons of payload, so also for Crossley Motors IGL8, Guy Motors FBAX, Thornycroft Tartar and Karrier CK6.
Crossley Motors IGL8 - 6x4 lorry
with searchlight.

Guy Motors FBAX - 6x4 lorry

Thornycroft Tartar 3ton - 6x4 - workshop
Notice the Mickey Mouse cammo

Karrier CK6 3 ton 6x4 lorry

    The Leyland Retriever had a standard structure with a front cab and then the cargo section. The first ones had an open cab with only a canvas roof. The driver was not protected by a windscreen or metal doors, but later versions got this one. The four-cylinder Leyland petrol engine had a displacement of 5,895 cc and was water cooled. The engine had a power of 73 hp.

A Leyland Retriever engine under restoration
font: https://hmvf.co.uk/topic/22792-leyland-retriever/
    The gearbox had four speeds and there was two reduction gear provided to ensure that driving in high and low gearing was possible. The cargo of the Retriever could be covered with a canvas roof. The fuel tank had a capacity of 141 liters. The spare tire was mounted between the cab and the loading area.
The vehicle had only drive on the four rear wheels (6x4). The rear axle was a draft of the British War Office and the Ministry had this available to all truck manufacturers which produce for the British army. 
    Similar vehicles with a three-tonne payload and 6x4 drive, the Crossley IGL8, Guy FBAX, Thornycroft Tartar and Karrier CK6. These were all produced in the same time.
    There was also an armored version, the Leyland Retriever type C Armored Tender Beaver-Eel, with various armaments, like 20mm gun, 7.7 MGs, which was used for the defense of military airfields in England. Around 336 units of this armed version were produced.
Leyland Retriever type C Armored Tender Beaver-Eel with some
of the side panels swung open to reveal the wheels.
Although no weapon has been yet fitted, all the loopholes have been
opened to show how thick the armour was.

Leyland Retriever type C Armored Tender Beaver-Eel with skirts
and 20mm gun. Notice the RAF markings


    Between 1939 and 1945 a total (standard and specialized versions) of 6542 Leyland Retrievers lorries were produced.
Leyland Retriever (early) 6x4 3 ton. lorry - caravan body
Somewhere in England

Leyland Retriever (early) 6x4 3 ton. lorry - Gantry version

captured Leyland Retriever (early) 6x4 3 ton. lorry - GS body
France - 1940.

 Leyland Retriever (late) 6x4 3 ton. lorry - Workshop body
Mickey Mouse cammo - France - 1944.

Leyland Retriever (early) 6x4 3 ton. lorry - GS body
Tunisia - 1942.
    If you want to read a more comprehensive history about this truck and this traditional manufacturer, take a look at this article on the Leyland Retriver Gantry, here at Bunker.

Specs:
Leyland Retriever 6x4 3 ton.
Type6x4 wheel drive
general purpose truck
Country of originEngland
Development history
ManufacturerLeyland Motors
Production period1939-1945
Number                     6.542 vehicles
Specifications
Length6.85 m
Width2.27 m
Height3.45 m

Engine


Transmission
Tyres
Leyland - 5.895cc
4-cylinder petrol engine  73hp @ 2100rpm
4 speed + 2 gear (red.)
9.00 x 20
Cargo capacity3t (60 CWT )
Fuel capacity140 L
Range310 km

The kit:
    For this commission work, I'll use the new kit from ICM Leyland Retriever General Service (early production) (#35602).
ICM box kit
       But enough talk and let's "attack" the kit:
The bald one, with his usual circumspection, examining the newly built chassis ...
The kit is well injected and the parts do not show any deformation ...
So far, a walk in the park ...
    The engine of the kit is very well detailed ... and it is a pity to know that all this detail will be "encapsulated" and invisible ... I will make the old technique of molding the lower part of the engine and the clutch and reproducing it in dental acrylic self-curing. The engine can be used in another project... or even in this one, as a "load" in the cargo bay ...
Leyland engine - right side

Leyland engine - left side


This time, I used dental alginate...
This gel is irreversible, but is fast...

The mold with engine's impression...

The lower part of the engine is copied in dental acrylic.
The cylindrical oil cooler was not well copied.
I will have to do it in scratch ... No problem ...

The oil cooler with bubbles ... a very ugly thing ...

The "engine" in position with the new oil cooler:
Plastruct plastic rod (2,5mm diameter) with thin copper wire...
Like a glove!!
    Here, I made a variation in the building sequence: I decided to build the front axle before the rear ones, to allow a perfect alignment between the axles, wheels and the chassis. Here is my recipe: build the front axle and place all parts in perpendicularity, so that there are no deviations in the construction of these parts....
Front axle: wheels in perpendicularity.
Notice that the inner parts of the wheels are in contact with the jigs ...
    While the glue on the front axle dries, I will do the same with the rear axles. But now, we have a problem: the rear axle tips are a little long, "pointing" out from the inner parts of the wheels, preventing me from using the inner part of the wheels as a flat face to be supported on the perpendicular jigs. The logical option here is to cut out these small pointed projections (red arrows, below), which do not interfere with gluing, but interfere with alignment. See the photos below:
Notice the projections of the rear axle, pointing out to
inner part of the wheels (see the diagram...).
Lets cut these points...
Left, the rear axle with surgery done (green arrows)
and right, virgin axle. Notice the points (red arrows)
The axle point cutted (red arrow). Notice in the
diagram, the inner part of wheel can it can be perfectly adjusted to the
flat part of the template, ensuring the perpendicularity of its position. 
It is now possible to align the axles and wheels to
the perpendicular plane, avoiding distortions ...
Perfect alignment between wheels and axles !!!
front view. Kojak is a wise guy!!!
When we glue the rear axles to the spring beams,
we place a small weight on the chassis to keep everything in place ...
And the final results of all the alignment work !!!
When the wheels are glued (after painting ...),
the Brit girl will be all pretty on top of her 6 shoes, stunning !!!
Belly view: cardan shafts, axles, suspensions,
engine, chassis ... all aligned !!

..and talking about alignement...all perfect!!

The wheels and tires...
Painting will be much easier ...

Building the cabin: notice the gearbox lever replaced by a pin ...

Dry run of the cabin in top of chassis... Cool!!
I wanted to test how much the cabin "hides" the view of the engine,
so that I can do some details on the "engine clone"...

Hmm..the engine rear view is awful...
When looking from below, there is an absence of the sides of the engine,
but the space is very narrow ...

I decided to make the "box" for the side walls of the engine,
but in a very crude way, as the view is minimal ...
I am definitely not a radical "Rivet Counter" !!!

Sprues and plasticard!!
I can almost hear from here, in the Southern Hemisphere,
a bloodthirsty mob screaming: Heresy !!!

Testing the "details" with the cabin ...
The whole thing will be very closed by the cabin and the radiator.
I'm really cool with this....

But the rear portion of the transmission is visible and scary ...
I'll have to fix it ...

In return, the radiator was a little gem !!
I salute you, ICM !!!

With the radiator in place, the entire engine portion was hidden,
in a normal angle of view ...
A little relief for this heretical modelist !!!

Cabin with spare wheel rack
and fuel tank...

Cabin with spare wheel rack and fuel tank: rear view
The flat portion is still very visible,,,hmmmmm

I added volume to the transmission, with acrylic "dripped" with brush ...
It looks almost the same, but the volume I got was clear ...
I'm satisfied, for now. Let's see with cargo bay in position ...

A view of the "clone engine", from its lower portion.
As you can see, the thing was satisfactory (IMHO)
There is very little space to see ...
I think "saving" the engine was worth it !!

And speaking about the cargo area, let's build the body.
There is controversy about the dimensions of this area, but this kit is
being a quick OOTB project. Nothing to complicate things here ...

The parts fit together wonderfully ...
This kit is being a real delight to build !!!
The best ICM so far in this regard !!!

Rear fenders...

Tool boxes and fenders in position...

Putting it all together...
The cargo area is in dry-run...

Right view...

The big left footboard...

The right one...

The canvas arches ... very fragile ...

Testing...testing...

Do you remember the infamous and scandalous heresy ??
It doesn't seem to be that big now ...

Really, not so big...

With the spare wheel in position,
I would say almost imperceptible ...

On the other hand, my truck may be carrying a spare engine,
 in its cargo area .... With all its details in sight ...
just build a wooden cradle and voiláaa !!
I think with that, I redeem myself a little from being unorthodox !!
    But one thing that is really bothering and worrying me, is the fragility of the arcs that support the canvas, in this kit. As I said at the beginning of this article, this kit is commission work and my client lives 1,400 km away. And the courier employees are always careful and sweet with our orders !!!
Man, these arches are very fragile and weak...
    Replacing the structural arches with something a little stronger ... Since I am in the field of heresies in this kit, a little more will not hurt anyone ... and after coated with canvas, the arches practically disappear ... .
My solution: another heresy!!
Arches made with copper wires...Much stronger !!!

Dry-run of the all parts togheter...
Testing the canvas of the cabin...
    And as the next step will be painting, let's go to historical research: and I think you must have noticed the spoyler in the pin up image at the beginning of the article. Our girl is providing services in the famous Operation Market Garden, September 1944, in the Netherlands, together with the 3rd Infantry Division (Ironsides), with Towed Field Batteries Artillery, as the number 2 ammunition and cargo carrier truck, along with the 1st Battery. The girl will proudly wear a Mickey Mouse camouflage!!

First of all, primer!!

Shades of green and Mickey Mouse cammo

Side view...

Rear view... Next step: markings!!!
Decal time: best part!!
Front and rear view: Ironsides!!!!

A very big allied star of aerial reconnaissance...
Nothing like having aerial superiority in these times...
 
Decals and painting in the dashboard...see below...

Leyland Retriever dashboard

   While the decals dry, let's go into a little more detail on the 4-cylinder Leyland engine. Let's make the spark plug wires!
Starting the spark plug wires made with thin copper wire...
Left side

Spark plug wires made with thin copper wire...
Right side

Spark plug wires made with thin copper wire...
Left side

I was forgetting to add the cab side handles and canvas roof tie rod pull handles... The kit comes without these parts, but they are easy to make with copper wire...
Details in metal....

Testing the engine in the cargo bay...

Gluing the canvas cover over the cabin...

Cabin alignment is critical...
    And speaking of alignment, it's time to glue the wheels in their places, with the greatest care with the alignment. Notice the squared metal parts that I use to keep the wheels perpendicular...
Rear whells in perfect perpendicular position...
    On the battlefront, a spare engine would be transported in a wooden cradle to facilitate transport and protect equipment. Let's make this crib for our baby!!
Crib made with balsa wood...
Starting by the base...

Wood and metal stabilization supports...

Wood and metal stabilization supports...
front right view

Testing...testing...
Notice the Leyland Retriever Gantry in background!!!

The engine crib, with their moorings transport ...
    Now, it's time to make the cargo bay canvas. The old method of using tracing-paper with PVA glue diluted 50% in water...
Measuring the tracing-paper...

Painting the inner portion of canvas with Khaki...

And the external part...Notice the top canvas area in red...
Mickey Mouse in the house!!!
And the tracing-paper as canvas, in the rear cargo area...
Sooo coool!!
Left side

3/4 rear left side

Right side...

Rear view

Next steps: mooring clips and accessories...
The end is near!!

Making mooring clips with 0,3mm copper wire

After drilling the plastic clips, glue the metal clips with cyanoacrylate...
left side

Mooring clips: right side
    Some colleagues have written to me about tying a canvas to a model...so let's see a little tutorial on mooring canvas:
   First of all: when gluing the canvas to the model, leave a "tab" (mooring zone) without glue, so you can pass the binding threads... If the canvas is fully glued in this area, your thread will tear the canvas when trying to pass through the canvas ... The function of the threads is only aesthetic... they are not the ones that keep the canvas in place.
Step 1: noticee that the canvas is glued to the side walls above the
so-called "mooring zone". This portion of canvas must NOT be glued to it...
THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT...
    Step 2: Cut a long piece of khaki polyester thread to make ALL the mooring on one side. Start by the tie ring, tie a knot and apply a microdrop of cyanoacrylate at the knot-metal junction.  Insert the thread into a fine sewing needle. It is with this needle that you will pass the thread through the mooring rings and, more importantly, transfix the canvas, making what would be the mooring eyes on the canvas.
The first knot of mooring.
After the knot was made, attach the thread to the needle...
    Step 3: Pierce the canvas very carefully, at the desired height, keeping the needle as tangent as possible to the side walls of the body, avoiding tearing the paper. Use tweezers to help with this step. I do not recommend threading the needle and at the same time threading the next mooring ring. This usually tears the paper... The ideal is to pass the needle through the canvas, pull the thread carefully and, in a second step, pass the needle through the mooring ring. No laziness or shortcuts at this time!!!
Piercing the canvas...
Notice the tangent position of the needle...

After passing through the canvas, we will pass through the mooring ring...
    Step 4: An important detail is that you keep the thread in tension (but gently, to avoid the thread "cutting" the canvas...). With the thread tensioned, you can apply a micro-drop of cyanoacrylate in the holes in the canvas and in the tying rings, to keep the whole tying well stretched and tense, without any danger to the paper or to the aesthetics.
Work methodically and in stages...
It may sound complicated, but it's not...

It is very important to keep the thread tensioned.
When moving from one mooring ring to another, the micro drop of cyanoacrylate
holds everything in position...Now, just repeat the procedure until the end.
Final step: Plan the final tie-up, always taking into consideration the logic of the thing... Then, just repeat the procedure on the other side... The results are usually very good...
Now, just repeat the procedure, until the final mooring...
    The real thing:
The clips painted in black and aged. The canvas is tied with khaki polyester thread.
The polyester thread is perfect...it doesn't look "furry". See the tutorial above...
Take a look at the Value Gear accessories I selected for the truck...
Left side

Inside cargo. The engine will be in the middle...

The mooring in the right side...
Notice the Value Gear detail...
My accessories, ready to install

Roll-bags in the left side stirrups...But they don't balance by themselves...
I have to do something to tie them into place

The spare engine and roll-bags...

Again, I need to do something...

Stay with us, Lads!!  New steps, soon!!